Foods That Are GMO’s by: Michael Edwards

Click on Photo to enlarge chart

Click on Photo to enlarge chart


 
It’s really awesome to see a growing concern over genetically modified foods. People seem to be waking up to this issue. They don’t want genetically modified foods in their diets. And for good reason!
 
 
Are GMOs Safe?
 
While many studies claim no correlation to any health issues with GMO consumption, there are a number of studies that do show frightening correlations including multi-organ damage and reproductive disruption. The serious health risks are becoming harder to dismiss.
 
 
How to Avoid GMOs

It’s not easy. It is estimated that 60 to 70 percent of processed food contains a GMO ingredient, according to the Colorado State University Extension.

As for produce, buying organic is one very good way to avoid GMOs. There are times when organic crops have been contaminated, but for the most part, buying organic keeps you free of genetically modified foods. We prefer to purchase most of our food from local farmer’s markets where we can get to know the farmers. Besides growing it yourself, local farmer’s markets are typically the best way to get the freshest, healthiest produce. And buy heirloom produce as much as possible! It’s funny looking, but much healthier and much tastier!

Another way to avoid GMOs is to avoid the foods that are most often genetically modified.
 
What Foods are Genetically Modified?
 
The foods most likely to be GMO are corn, soybeans, cotton (for oil), canola (also a source of oil), squash, papaya, and sugar beets, which are refined into sugar. There’s also GMO alfalfa, but that is used for animal feed, not for sprouts that people eat. That leaves quite a lot of your garden untouched.

 
 
For the full article by Michael Edwards visit: http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com/foods-that-are-gmo
Michael-Edwards
About the Author:

Michael Edwards is the founder, owner, editor-in-chief, and janitor for Organic Lifestyle Magazine. At age 17, Michael weighed more than 360 pounds. He suffered from allergies, frequent bouts of illness, and chronic, debilitating insomnia.

Conventional medicine wasn’t working. While he restored his health through alternative medicine he studied natural health and became immersed in it.

Organic Goji Berry – Super Health Food

Click on Photo to go to the Huffingtonpost Website for more information.

Click on Photo to go to the Huffingtonpost Website for more information.

One of the hot things on the market today is organic goji berries. Of course with being grown organically you will not have the pesticides used on them, and they are better for you.  Himalayan Goji Berry Juice Goji berry as a health food came to the public consciousness in Western countries less than 10 years ago. Marketed in the West mostly as organic Goji berry, this plant belongs to the Solanaceae family that also includes tomato, potato, chili, eggplant, tobacco, pepper and chili. Even as health benefits of Goji berry is a fairly recent phenomenon among Western cultures, the plant has long been among the medicinal and culinary ingredients used in China. Known in China as wolf berry  the plant has already been cited in literature on alternative herbal medicine dating to as far back as the 7th and 16th century.

The fountain of youth is a myth but there is a beverage of recent vintage in the world market that approximates the promise of perennial vitality and well-being. This drink is Goji berry juice extracted from a fruiting vine that thrives in the inhospitable slopes of the Himalayas. The potency of the Goji berry fruit is rooted to ancient cultures whose influence remains pervasive to these modern days.

The fruits of Goji ripen into small, shiny red berries that develop from cone-shaped, light violet flowers. Among the beneficial nutrients said to be present in these berries are proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, amino acids and dietary fibers. As a health food supplement, Goji is marketed as a major ingredient in juices, creams, bars and capsules. Some Goji berries are also sold in their dried or desiccated form making these products appear like shriveled red raisins. These processed Goji tastes slightly sour and sweet with a mild tangy flavor. In traditional Chinese medicine, the berries are taken raw which may help explain why the organic Goji berry cultivation is encouraged in China and in Tibet. Many Asian dishes also contain Goji berries as a garnishing in the foods’ recipes.

Several health benefits that could be derived from Goji fruit have been advanced by food supplement manufacturers. These health benefit claims include the protection of the liver, improvement of the sexual function and fertility, boosting the immune function, improving circulation and promoting longevity. Goji berry is also said to enhance physical performance by increasing stamina and strengthening the legs. Other health food manufacturers promote Goji berry products by saying that these can be useful in preventing age-related eyesight deterioration, relieving menstrual pains, reducing cholesterol levels and addressing treatment of hepatitis and cancer.

In addition to several provinces in China, Goji is also grown in the Himalayas, specifically in Tibet. The growing of Goji berry in accepted standards of organic cultivation is particularly popular in these areas where producers claim that their produce are certified by the Chinese government as passing organically grown food benchmarks.