Good Health Tips

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Maintaining a healthy body and lifestyle with bring a lot of good fortune in the future. People that stick to strict healthy lifestyles end up looking younger than they normally are and remain healthy and active many years after. It can be tricky for younger folks to stay motivated in being healthy because many people already feel healthy and just want to do what they are most comfortable in doing. But slowly applying some of the small tips for good health doesn’t hurt.

In fact, some health tips are actually easy to implement than others and once the benefits of these small health tips surface, people will be far more interested in trying out more methods to live even healthier. Here are some of the basic tips for good health that everyone can try out without much difficulty.

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Let’s Get Physical!

Click on Photo to go to the Mayo Clinic Website for more information.

Click on Photo to go to the Mayo Clinic Website for more information.

 

Engage in regular physical activity and reduce sedentary activities to promote health, psychological well-being, and a healthy body weight.

To reduce the risk of chronic disease in adulthood: Engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity, above usual activity, at work or home on most days of the week.

For most people, greater health benefits can be obtained by engaging in physical activity of more vigorous intensity or longer duration.

To help manage body weight and prevent gradual, unhealthy body weight gain in adulthood: Engage in approximately 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity on most days of the week while not exceeding caloric intake requirements.

To sustain weight loss in adulthood: Participate in at least 60 to 90 minutes of daily moderate-intensity physical activity while not exceeding caloric intake requirements. Some people may need to consult with a healthcare provider before participating in this level of activity.

Achieve physical fitness by including cardiovascular conditioning, stretching exercises for flexibility, and resistance exercises or calisthenics for muscle strength and endurance.

Headache w/ Neck Pain

Click on Photo to go to the Better Health Channel Website for more information.

Click on Photo to go to the Better Health Channel Website for more information.

If you frequently get a headache with neck pain you may be suffering from muscle problems. Muscles can refer pain to the head. There is one particular region of the neck that is commonly involved in headaches

Most likely, the headache is caused by neck problems like poor posture, overuse, or stress. There is pain on motion which may also be in the shoulder of the same side. The headache pain is mild to severe with no throbbing sensation and may change when pressure is applied to the muscles. The headaches may last from a few hours to a few days or even weeks.

Other structures in the neck can cause headaches. The discs and joints may also refer pain to the head in a similar manner. Degenerative neck arthritis can produce these types of headaches. Neck related headaches are the cause in as high as 20% of patients with chronic headaches and is four times more prevalent in women.

Neck related headaches must have at least one of the following:

1. The head pain must be preceded by:

• Neck movement
• Prolonged awkward head position
• Pressure over the upper half of the neck or base of the skull on the headache side

2. Restricted motion of the neck

3. Neck, shoulder or arm pain

If all three are present, it’s most likely that the neck related headache as the cause is most likely the same.

Characteristics of Neck Related Headache:

• Often, a history of neck trauma (whiplash, sprain, strain)
• One sided headache that does not change sides
• Occasionally, the pain may be on both sides
• Pain located at base of skull, front of head, sides of head or around the eyes
• Pain may last hours or days
• The headache usually begins in the neck
• The headache is moderate to severe in intensity
• The headache is not throbbing
• The pain is not sharp

Other features which may be noted:

• Nausea
• Sensitivity to sound
• Sensitivity to light
• Dizziness
• Difficulty swallowing
• Blurred vision on the side of the headache
• Vomiting
• Tearing on the side of the headache
• Swelling around the eye on the side of headache

Headaches related to the neck as described in this article often respond well to Chiropractic adjustments so you may want to seek the advice of a practitioner in your area.

Remember there are many causes for headaches and neck pain. Always see your health care provider to determine the exact cause. Headaches can be very complicated and may indicate serious problems like meningitis with headache, neck pain and fever so don’t delay proper attention with serious symptoms.

Cluster Headaches: Signs and Symptoms

Click on Photo to go to the Cleveland Clinic Website for more information.

Click on Photo to go to the Cleveland Clinic Website for more information.


Cluster headaches are recurring attacks of excruciating, stabbing pain on one side your head, usually behind the eye. Men experience cluster headaches eight times more often than women do. These headaches occur nearly every day or several times a day for weeks or months, and then disappear for several months or even years. Attacks may last from 15 minutes to three hours, and often occur during the night.

There are two kinds of cluster headaches — episodic and chronic. In episodic cluster headaches, there are long, pain-free remissions. In chronic cluster headaches, there are no long remissions. If during the past year or longer, you experience periods of only a week or less of relief between headache attacks, you may be diagnosed with chronic cluster headaches. About 10 percent of cluster headache sufferers have the chronic condition.

Other symptoms usually occur on the side of the head where burning or penetrating pain is felt in or around an eye. Occasionally the pain extends to your forehead, nose, cheek or upper jaw. Other symptoms include:

• Red or teary eyes
• Runny or stuffy nose
• Facial swelling

Cluster headaches usually don’t run in families and don’t appear to be hereditary.