Canning Tomatoes 101 by: Patrick Barton

Click on Photo to go to the Canning Tomatoes 101 by Patrick Barton video for the full canning process.

Click on Photo to go to the Canning Tomatoes 101 by Patrick Barton video for the full canning process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here we are canning 50 pounds of NON-GMO Beef Steak tomatoes from Georgia. Canning tomatoes, especially a large amount of tomatoes, is one of the best ways to keep and store freshly picked garden tomatoes. Canned tomatoes will stay fresh for several years and are especially good for home made chili.

When preparing the tomatoes, wash, core, and blanch the tomatoes. Blanching means to dip the tomatoes in boiling water for approximately 30 seconds. What blanching does is makes the skin of the tomato come right off.

After blanching, place the tomatoes in an ice bath. After the ice bath, peel the skin off the tomatoes. The skins of the tomatoes will mostly come right off very easily.

Then cut the tomatoes into four pieces (also known as quartering).

Place 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid and 1 teaspoon of salt in each jar. You can also use 1/2 teaspoon of real lemon or fresh lemon juice.

Wash your canning jars with warm soap and water and then place them in your dishwasher on the sanitize cycle. Do not touch the rims or the lids. Place lids in warm water so they get soft.

Pack the jars with tomatoes.

Place the lids and rings on the packed jars and place them in boiling water for 40 minutes so it will sterilize everything.

After 40 minutes, take the jars out of the water and let them cool. As they cool, they will seal. Be careful because the jars are very hot. Use oven mitts and a jar lifter to remove from the hot water.

Happy canning!

 

For more videos by Patrick Barton visit his YouTube channel at:

www.patrickbartonsfood.com

Visit him on Facebook at:

https://m.facebook.com/patrickbartonsfood

Visit his Google+ channel at:

https://plus.google.com/114413240426264419217/posts

Follow him on twitter at:

https://twitter.com/patbartonsfood

 

 

 

Hydration: Why It’s So Important? by: familydoctor.org editorial staff

Click on photo to go to the FamilyDoctor.org Website for more information.

Click on photo to go to the FamilyDoctor.org Website for more information.

Why is it so important to stay hydrated?

Your body depends on water to survive. Every cell, tissue, and organ in your body needs water to work correctly. For example, your body uses water to maintain its temperature, remove waste, and lubricate joints. Water is needed for good health.

How does my body lose water?

Water makes up more than half of your body weight. You lose water each day when you go to the bathroom, sweat, and even when you breathe. You lose water even faster when the weather is really hot, when you are physically active, or if you have a fever. Vomiting and diarrhea can also lead to rapid water loss. If you don’t replace the water you lose, you can become dehydrated.

How do I know if I’m dehydrated?

Symptoms of dehydration include the following:

Little or no urine, or urine that is darker than usual
Dry mouth
Sleepiness or fatigue
Extreme thirst
Headache
Confusion
Dizziness or lightheaded feeling
No tears when crying

Don’t wait until you notice symptoms of dehydration to take action. Actively prevent dehydration by drinking plenty of water.

Who is at higher risk of dehydration?

People are at higher risk of dehydration if they exercise at a high intensity, have certain medical conditions, are sick, or are not able to get enough fluids during the day. Older adults are also at higher risk. As you get older, your brain may not be able to sense dehydration and send the signals for thirst.

You may need to increase the amount of water you are drinking if you:

Have certain medical conditions, such as kidney stones or bladder infection
Are pregnant or breastfeeding
Will be outside during hot weather
Will be exercising
Have a fever
Have been vomiting or have diarrhea
Are trying to lose weight

How much water should I drink each day?

You may have heard different recommendations for daily water intake. Most people have been told they should drink 6 to 8 8-ounce glasses of water each day, which is a reasonable goal. However, different people need different amounts of water to stay hydrated. Most healthy people can stay well hydrated by drinking water and other fluids whenever they feel thirsty. For some people, fewer than 8 glasses may be enough. Other people may need more than 8 glasses each day.
Here’s a good tip to follow: go by your body weight. Divide your body weight by 2 and that’s how many ounces of water to drink a day. For example: if a person weighs 50 lbs, then they should drink 25 ounces of water a day. If a person weighs 100 lbs, then they drink 50 ounces. A 200 lbs person drinks 100 ounces.

If you are concerned that you are not drinking enough water, check your urine. If your urine is consistently colorless or light yellow, you are most likely staying well hydrated. Dark yellow or amber-colored urine is a sign of dehydration.

Why Does Your Knee Snap and Pop? by: Howard J. Luks, MD

Click on Photo to go to the Howard Luks, MD Website for more information

Click on Photo to go to the Howard Luks, MD Website for more information

Why Does Your Knee Snap and Pop?

Snapping and popping knees bring many patients in the door. Some patients have painful snapping of their knee and some simply have snapping with no pain. Some patients note a history of trauma, some do not recall any injury. While not all cases of knee popping require treatment, some do. Let’s explore what are some of the more common reasons that our knees will snap and pop.

What Makes Our Knees Snap and Pop?

Our knee joint is composed of three bones — the end of the femur or thigh bone; the top of the tibia or shin bone, and the patella, or kneecap. The knee is supported or held together by a number of ligaments. The knee moves because of a number of large strong muscles and tendons. The force across the knee is borne by the medial and lateral menisci, which are two cartilage discs that protect the cartilage surfaces of our knees.

All of these structures can be damaged by activity, trauma, injury or simple degeneration. Many injuries to the knee structures mentioned above can causes snapping and popping of your knee.

Most common reasons your knees pop or snap:

Chondromalacia
Meniscus tears
Cartilage Defects
Patella Instability
Osteoarthritis

(See website for description of each).
 
 
 
There are many more less common causes of knee snapping and popping. The issues mentioned above usually cause painful snapping and popping within the knee. If you have painful popping, snapping and swelling you should see your doctor.

Many of you will have painless knee popping and snapping. Sometimes our knee pops or snaps for no known reason. In many situations it is simply “normal” and no treatment is necessary.

 
 
 
Howard J. Luks, MD
About the Author:

A Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon who specializes in the treatment of the shoulder, knee, elbow, and ankle. I have a very “social” patient centric approach and believe that the more you understand about your issue, the better your decisions will be. Ultimately your treatments and my recommendations will be based on proper communications, proper understanding, and shared decision making principles — all geared to improve your quality of life.

My Shoulder Snaps and Pops and I Hear Clicking … Why? by Howard J. Luks, MD

Click on Photo to go to the Howard Luks, MD website for more information.

Click on Photo to go to the Howard Luks, MD website for more information.

Snapping Shoulder

Shoulder snapping and poppingShoulder snapping or popping is a very common issue— it is so common that this is one of the most frequently searched topics on my website. I see between 5-10 patients a week who are simply in my office because they want to know – Why my shoulder snaps and pops?

The shoulder is a very complex joint composed of bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, and two different linings we call the synovium and the bursa. If any of these structures are injured, the smoothly functioning shoulder can pop, snap or click. These “injuries” can be simply due to everyday use, chronic repetitive stress of sports or because of a significant trauma, fall or accident. The most common cause of rotator cuff related pain and popping is rotator cuff tendinosis

Should I be worried if my shoulder pops?

Most of the time the clicking or snapping is due to everyday use and changes that occur naturally within our joints. As we age this causes some of the surfaces to roughen —thus when they rub against one another they will snap, click, or pop within the shoulder. In the majority of circumstances snapping or clicking of the shoulder is not an issue to worry about. Painless clicking and popping usually does not require any treatment at all. Once I see you for your shoulder examination many of you have tried various remedies. I’ve seen many of you try Glucosamine , and Hyaluronic Acid to try and “smooth” things out. Additionally, many of you have tried Tart Cherry Juice as a natural anti-inflammatory. Sometimes you report these supplements worked… but most of the time I do not hear favorable recommendations. Many of you have also tried a shoulder brace or compression sleeve — but generally find these to be cumbersome.

On the other hand, clicking or popping of shoulder may also soon after an injury. That might mean that you have sustained a “significant” injury. There are occasions when popping or snapping could signify a problem in your shoulder.

*If your shoulder was injured and it is now sliding in and out of place (instability), it may snap or pop.

*If the rotator cuff was injured or torn, the torn edge could snap or pop. Or…

*If the labrum of the shoulder was torn, your shoulder may also snap or pop.

*A piece of cartilage has torn loose and you have a “loose body” getting caught in the shoulder.

*If the snapping is in the back of the shoulder, it could be an issue with your shoulder blade, or scapula.
 
 
Causes of Shoulder Snapping or Popping Video

 
 
Howard J. Luks, MD

About the Author:

A Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon who specializes in the treatment of the shoulder, knee, elbow, and ankle. I have a very “social” patient centric approach and believe that the more you understand about your issue, the better your decisions will be. Ultimately your treatments and my recommendations will be based on proper communications, proper understanding, and shared decision making principles — all geared to improve your quality of life.